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Vince
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« on: March 06, 2009, 05:07:59 pm »

Ever wondered what it's like to be a game developer? Well, Annie Carlson is one of the lucky girls who was admitted into the glamorous world of geekdom. This is her tale:

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1. How does a girl with a Bachelor degree in English end up making video games and, most importantly, why?

The funny thing is that everyone looks at my college experience and goes “whoa, how do you go from that into videogames?”   Which is a bit odd as I don’t think English is that weird of a degree to transition into videogames from.  Maybe if I’d gotten that minor in geology I was planning on (purely so I could get college credit for studying dinosaurs), or that theater major, but maybe it’s a “hey you’re a girl” thing, which is, I suppose, a very valid question, given that only about 11% of people in games are women.  Anyhow.

The short answer (which I’ve gotten away from already) is that I’ve always loved games, since I got my brother sick with the chicken pox back when I was six (inadvertently but wouldn’t it be wonderful if I’d done it on purpose).  He had to stay home from school for two weeks, and out of pity, a friend of the family loaned us his Nintendo – I saw Castlevania for the first time ever and from then on I wanted to make games.  That was the moment. 

Growing up I didn’t really know how to get into the game industry – even now there’s this sort of veil of mystery surrounding a lot of what game developers do – and I figured since I wasn’t the best at art or programming, I should stick to writing.  So when I got that English major, I went out the gate thinking I’d get my PhD in English/Media Studies and teach about games. 

But while I was trying to get into grad school I worked part-time at a GameStop, and by happenstance that was the place that a hojillion developers in the area went to on their lunch break.  So I ended up meeting people from Troika, Blizzard, Interplay, Point of View, The Collective – and eventually I asked an Interplay person if they were hiring.  I got in an application about two months before the whole operation went tits-up, but thankfully I knew a guy who had a roommate who got me into Papaya Studio as an admin… type… person.  It wasn’t a really well-defined position, but it got my foot in the door, which is really what matters.

 
2. So you've spent a year making a canceled game at Papaya Studio. Can you describe this whole "working on a canceled game" experience that's becoming so common in the industry?

I wouldn’t say it’s “becoming” common per se – we’re just seeing bigger, more publicized projects bite it as publishers start scrambling for money.  Projects are always canceled, and for reasons from the valid to the totally inane… it’s just that most often, you don’t hear word one about it.  Heck, Taxi Driver was cancelled in October 2005, and people didn’t hear anything about it until… February 2006, I think.  Not only do you not hear about cancelled games that haven’t get announced, most often there’s a struggle to keep it under wraps when they have been (like Aliens RPG, anyone?)

For cancelled projects, it really depends on the project you’re working on and the state it was in when it got axed.  Sometimes it’s an enormous relief – the team could’ve felt things were going nowhere, and the funds used for it are better allocated someplace else.  Sometimes – like with the project I first worked on at Obsidian – it’s just in its early stages, and you feel disheartened and pissed because it had so much promise that it wasn’t able to properly display.  And other projects… like I said, it does depend.

Taxi Driver – the aforementioned cancelled game – is a mixed bag in my mind.  There was a lot of wrangling on the type of game it was supposed to be, and a linear mission structure vs. an open world, and so on.  I spent a LOT of time working on the dialogue to make it correct to the feel of the movie (and even studied phrases and slang from the area and time period), read the screenplay, studied up on things (even still there are only so many ways to make a thug scream “He shot me in my fuckin’ leg” before your research runs dry).  I think making a game from that movie was problematic because no matter what you do, there’s going to be a lot of people who will not only never like the game, but will hate you personally for making it.  Showing the game at E3 2005 was literally nerve-wracking for me, I kept thinking someone was going to jump out and stab me in the eyeball.

In the end, the game was something I was glad to have worked on, and at the same time, glad it didn’t come out.  The city was looking great, the missions were pretty solid, but I kept feeling like trying to squeeze gameplay within the structure of Travis Bickle’s character wasn’t working out like it should – or I should say, I didn’t feel like it really could work.  Taxi Driver is a good movie, and should stay in the medium of cinema.  From the attempt I learned a lot about mission structure, puzzles, camera difficulties, scripting, and the fact that no matter how many times I yelled at them to stop, other designers would always put in something like “yeah, I’m talking to YOU!” to fuck up my dialogue.  They must have looooooved to see me go batshit over that.

…also to this day I can never watch Taxi Driver again.  I must have watched it – in accumulated parts as well as a whole – well over 20 times to get the feel of scenes right.  No more, I tell you.


3. Next step - Obsidian Entertainment. You are a production design assistant on an unreleased console game. What do production design assistants of unreleased console games do?


Heh – I think that title came from attempting to make a higher-tier QA and a lower-tier junior designer and coming up with a bastard child of the two.  You work with the designers instead of with the rest of QA, but don’t have the same clout.  Titles like that change from company to company (even project to project) but I would imagine it’s safe to say it’s somewhere on that power scale.

For that project - which I mentioned above was a beautiful, gossamer thing killed before its time - I spent a lot of time reviewing design documents, got to design the flow of a level (the first time I worked one-on-one with Brian Mitsoda, actually), and put together a proposed system for ambient life.  It was actually a spectacular little system for grooming people for a junior designer job and finding out what their strengths were – I wasn’t the only “production design assistant” that got promoted to a junior design position.

 
4. 3 months later you are a brand new NWN2 designer. What's the story there?

Good grooming and being awesome – but seriously, I think my career development at Obsidian can be marked by a few people having a lot of confidence in me, and giving me opportunities to excel.  The first of these is the most awesome Kevin Saunders, who was the lead designer on the console title I started out on at Obsidian (rest its sweet beautiful game-soul), and who took over supervising my work on NWN2.  I’d sort of been chucked onto the project haphazardly, and spent my first few weeks playing randomly through areas and giving feedback – Kevin gave me direction and a hefty responsibility when he gave me complete control of handling all the items in the game.  At first I was kind of poleaxed (hurr hurr get it), but managed to get things in control and organized, and sort through a mess of several thousand items.  I figure I did a good enough job there that the Powers That Be went “boy howdy, her head didn’t explode! Promote her!” and so it was.

 
5. When NWN2 OC is out, you are invited to a one year long Alpha Protocol party, during which you've managed to work for 3 months on Mask of the Betrayer. So what did you do on Alpha Protocol, why did you take a break to work on MotB, and what did you do there?

Funny thing, that – I didn’t ever actually leave Alpha Protocol during that time.  I joined the AP team in November 2006, after we finished the first patch to NWN2, and around about in February 2007 Kevin Saunders takes me out for coffee and asks if I wouldn’t mind terribly making some items for Mask of the Betrayer in my off-time because I am so good at making items.  So of course I said YES.

It was a trick balancing the two games, particularly because my tasks on AP were so demanding, but basically after the standard work hours were done, I worked on MotB stuff, as well as coming in on the weekends.  I have to emphasize that nobody made me do this, and actually at one point I had to assure the then-lead designer for AP that my work for MotB wasn’t endangering anything else.  And it was a really interesting experience, and I’m glad I had a chance to contribute to it – and once again I owe props to Kevin Saunders for giving me such an opportunity.

As for Alpha Protocol – the second person I owe a lot to is Brian Mitsoda, who was AP’s Creative Lead, and took me on as a writing assistant shortly after I joined the team.  Even as I started doing my thing with organizing the massive amounts of dialogue and structure that were going to be involved in the game, I started working with him on refining my writing skills.  Eventually he gave me the Handler character – who had the second most lines in the game aside from the protagonist – and we collaborated on writing scenes (very old-school, even: we’d sit at a computer, he’d write a line, and I’d try to think of a follow-up line that was on par with his). 

From there, I was also given another major character to write, and began to put together minor scenes by myself.  In addition to this, I was working with Brian to structure dialogues, cast parts, attend voice-over sessions, and work with the level designers about what VO they needed for their areas.  It was a very insane process, and in any given week I was attending a VO session, writing dialogue, putting written dialogue into templates, casting a part, reviewing a level, and organizing about five different documents.  Crazypants.


6. Overall, the Obsidian chapter of your life sounds incredibly chaotic. You are thrown from one project to another, ending up on the Aliens RPG and, I guess, leaving after the game went dead. How do you deal with it? How did that experience affect you?

“Chaotic” - delightful bit of understatement right there!  I’d say it kind of left be expecting that kind of chaos in an industry job, and in a way, that’s really what I enjoy about being a designer.  You’re not doing the same sort of thing every day, you’ve got a lot of very diverse tasks, and you’re always expected to learn a lot of new things from one moment to the next.  At times its driven me near complete madness, but most often that kind of pressure makes me thrive.  Like with taking on MotB as a separate, on-my-own-time project, I liked being able to contribute to multiple things.  Josh Sawyer even asked for my opinion on an early character document on Aliens at that time, and I went around preening like an idiot because “I worked on three different games in one week!”  I’m a goddamn madwoman.

RE: Aliens – I did actually leave before the game got the axe, but I can imagine how it might have felt.  I was actually moved onto Aliens before Storm of Zehir was complete, and I have to admit that though the move was necessary, and they needed another writer (just as they did when they pulled me from Alpha Protocol onto SoZ), the experience is pretty jarring.  It’s not so much the “working on lots of projects” thing, it’s the sort of yearning for completion you get when you’re transferred.  For SoZ, some of the biggest tweaks happen in that last month.  If you can’t get a quest to work and you’re staring down that gold master, and that quest isn’t critical path?  ZING, no more quest!  There’s stuff in there I thought the game shipped with – five random encounters in Samarach come to mind – but ended up getting snipped at the last minute.  It’s not critical stuff by any means, but it does stick in your head a little.  And AP went through vast changes after I left, and my stuff’s not in the game anymore – which any designer mopes about but knows that’s how this business works – and I don’t know what the game’s gonna be like!  Aside from my secret networks of information, I’m waiting to see like the rest of the populace. 

…so yeah.  It’s part of the industry, and sometimes it’s trickier to roll with the punches, but since my cry is “I go where I am needed” and I like working on new stuff, it was easier for me to adapt, I think.

 
7. Next step - a lead writer job on Storm of Zehir. Finally a real responsibility! Something people can blame you for. How does it feel? What do you think about the story, the quests, and the reaction the game received?

I’d say I’m very proud of Storm of Zehir – for a tiny (and very talented) team with no time and no budget, I think we pulled off something very cool.  One thing I wish I could’ve done is spent more time improving my work with the scripting language, and more rounding out my areas… the troubling thing is that there were five designers total for the project, which meant that there was maybe one of us who was focusing purely on areas.  I think Samargol came out pretty well, but it definitely wasn’t something I did without help.  If I had my way, I’d have made certain areas have more sidequests – made the bounty quests more significant, for one – but that’s the sort of minor stuff that ends up snipped early on.

Writing for SoZ was a unique challenge not only because Mask of the Betrayer was such a hard act to follow, but because of the nonlinear nature of the game and that I was specifically forbidden to do a lot of stuff that fans of the series expected – deep story, companions, etc.  There were a lot of things I wanted to go into detail on, but there was a design directive to make conversations “wide” (i.e. a lot of decisions) instead of “deep” (a lot of nested dialogue).  Shaping the story was something that was really done as a group, so there are more situations where I came into things with existing conversations and edited them into a final format rather than shaping them myself… adding personality and such to an existing conversation skeleton that is basically [ask about merchant factions] -> [stuff about merchant factions] -> [stuff about my faction] and so on.  I think I had a lot less power than typical lead writers, but that was the nature of the project and how small it was – everyone had multiple tasks. 

I think the reaction that the game received was pretty in-line with my expectations – the team went in like “Woooo Gold Box games, Darklands, old-school!” and the real intent to do something different.  And while I think nobody really knew how much an open-world game was going to be, I think the goal of achieving that old-school feel was sound, and that’s how the game did end up.  And obviously that’s not what a lot of people were expecting, and if you’d asked me to design the game on my own that’s probably not what I would have settled on myself (also, I think I’d have gone mad).  But I think it was a something everyone on the team was on board with, and I do think it turned out well.  Do I wish we’d had larger dungeons in it, more sidequests, more elaboration on story elements, more cohort dialogue?  Most definitely (and one day I do intend to put out a mod with these things) – but they’re things you have to triage, nice elements that are by no means critical to making a solid game. 

That’s also the thing about being a designer on released titles – you will always, always have things you look at and stuff you remember cutting and sighing wistfully about it.  But I really do have a great sense of pride when I think about SoZ.


8. So you've worked on all three NWN2 games. How would you evaluate all three from the design point of view?

Argh, that’s tough to say.  I think the original campaign of NWN2 had a lot working against it because there was so much planned for it, and so much that just had to get cut to make sure the game actually got out the door.  Figuring the scope of things like that is difficult because you get the times back from speed runs and you fret and go “oh dear oh dear that’s too short,” and then a normal person plays it and it’s a bajillion hours long.  But that’s another rant from me about game length.  Anyhow.

I think on NWN2, there was a lot of just attempting to figure out how to wrangle a new engine and work a new system and go for something new in the series.  The big thing was having a party, and trying to shape a story that included companions, and an influence system, and putting it in a big “save the world” wrapper.  I think there’s a lot of the generic in NWN2, but in my mind it’s a sort of setting on the stage, and there was a lot of growth within Obsidian at the time, expanding from a small studio into one with two full-size teams and dealing with that.  So I’d call NWN2 the weakest of the series, but admitting at the same time that it’s kind of an unfair cop because it is the main game, without the luxury of working with something you’re familiar with that you have in expansions.

I think Mask of the Betrayer is the best, not just because George Zeits’ work is awesome, but because it was an opportunity to explore a very different mythos within the Forgotten Realms, a different and more personal story, and a refinement of systems and things that went before.  Refinement is actually the term that I’d use to describe MotB.  Really, the only new system in there is the spirit eater, and though there were a lot of new classes, you had programmers fresh from wrangling stuff for NWN2 leaping into it and knowing exactly what to do.  So you had the luxury of really focusing on it – and it had the advantage of not being a high-profile project, so it got to slyly pull resources from other teams (like me!) without having to deal with having a ton of people dedicated to it. 

I think it’s also hard to compare Storm of Zehir against the other two because, as I’d said – the goal was to really do something different, and that if you went into the game expecting something exactly the same as NWN2 or MotB, you’d be surprised.  There were a fair amount of new systems, and design theories to go along with them – we did have the same advantages as MotB in that we had a small team, and artists who were old hat at making areas, and programmers who knew the code, and designers who’d been working in the NWN2 toolset for years.  But there was a lot of new stuff in there, and things in common with NWN2 because we were discovering things as we went along.  I’d rank SoZ higher than the original campaign, but with reservations because to me, it’s significantly different in direction and intention than the other two.

…And yes you may call that a cop-out.  What can I say, these are the only three games I’ve ever had released!  They’re still near and dear.

 
9. Any comments on the publisher-developer relationship? What does being a mainstream studio (and working for one) mean today?

It’s really hard to comment on dealing with publishers, mostly because it’s not my direct job, really: I’m the kid in the trenches, not in the command center.  It’s really easy to slag on things when you’re standing on the sidelines - I heard from a fellow developer once that “Publishers think developers are lazy, and devs think publishers are stupid.”  It’s not a relationship that you want to be adversarial, and I think it doesn’t have to be.  I’ve heard horror stories about dealing with publishers, but also the same where developers really are wasting money and screwing around.  It depends on the situation, and the end of the day, what we want is a finished game we’re proud of and that will (very hopefully!) make some money.  The game industry has the dual difficulties of being a creative medium and something that is run as a business, and there’s always going to be friction over which takes precedence.  I wish there was less mystery on both sides about what goes on in the process of dealing with one another, but I think for business reasons we’re not going to hear much from publishers or developers on that. 

Mainstream Studio equals = High. Fucking. Expectations.  And also a certain breed that will love you no matter what you do, and another breed who will hate you in the same way.  When I see people use the phrase “I will NEVER FORGIVE Obsidian for what they did to KOTOR2!” I think “Holy shit, man, take it easy!”  I can understand how pissed they can be, but my God, did Obsidian as a whole run over their cat?  A company is made up of individuals, it’s not one mass identity.  People very, very easily forget that.

But as a mainstream studio, you get a chance to work on big, high-profile games… which comes with its own set of ups and downs.  Sometimes it’s fun to preen and show off about it, other times you just want people to stop nitpicking every rumor they hear and talking crap.  It can be a harder thing to deal with… especially when you’re dealing with the aforementioned people who will loathe you no matter what.  Also it does tend to occasionally offer you less flexibility because of larger team sizes and more stratified roles, but knowing what you’re doing and who you answer to can be nice too.

So, mixed bag.  Yay I am being unspecific again!  But it really is one.  There are multiple sides to everything.

 
10. After working on 4 different games, what would you want to work on and why? What kind of game are you dying to make?

I’d really like to spend more time working on level design, to be honest: I’ve worked on the writing side of a lot of titles, but I want to expand my skills in multiple directions.  Systems would be cool too, but it’s so many little sections working within a big whole – it’s more intimidating to me, so I’d probably want to approach that one a little later.  And writing whenever I can get it.  I’m a sucker for writing and I always will be.

As for what kind of game… not sure.  Part of me would like to work on a genuinely serious game that tackles modern-day issues in a realistic fashion, and the other part revels in ridiculousness, like the (to quote Penny Arcade) “ultra-thug pastiche” of Saints Row 2 and its gleeful and juvenile preposterousness.  I think it would a great deal of fun to make a game based on the old tabletop Paranoia license (YOU LOVE THE COMPUTER. THE COMPUTER IS YOUR FRIEND), and even possibly the madcap insanity of Toon (make your own Conker’s Bad Fur Day?).  On the serious side… I wouldn’t mind doing an old-school RPG involving a non-bog-standard set of myths and races – non orcs/elves, non Celtic/Roman mythology.  Something that set out with a good solid and innovative setting, built upon that enjoyable gameplay, then covered that with a nice thick frosting of story. 

Also in the future I do want to work on a game where “Mature” doesn’t mean “the characters say words like ‘shit’ and we get to show boobies,” but actually attempts to tell and interesting, complex, and well-crafted narrative.  Please.

 
11. What's wrong with the industry? Simple question, I know.

Man, how long do you want this interview to be? Jeez…

…It’s not just one thing, obviously.  I have my own pet concerns, but the thing that keeps coming to mind for me is that companies pour money into games to get the latest everything, and turn out an industry that’s AAA or Bust.  Either a game is a huge success, or it tanks and the team gets laid off.  There seems to be less and less room for investment in games that are out to be modest successes, that don’t try to excel on every single artistic level but create something solid.  More modest, mid-range titles that may not be the very best-looking thing out there, but are fun as hell to play.  I feel like that’d offer up a lot more opportunities to take risks and offer up unique concepts – if you don’t have to sign up a massive budget to it and can make good use of existing technology you’re familiar with, everybody saves money, and the gamer wins in the end.

As far as smaller, more affordable projects go, CRPGs have the advantage in many ways because it’s far easier to develop for them than multiple consoles – but due to the technical demands (whether in terms of raw power or simple dedication to troubleshoot the damn thing), many people don’t invest in computer games.  It’s odd that there seems to be this split in computer gaming between the very hardcore and the very casual, with MMO players often bridging that gap.  I think one of the things that made World of Warcraft so successful is that you can play that on anything, and it’s very easy to troubleshoot.  Sure, not every game can have a virtual army of Game Masters on hand to help with issues, but I think there’s a kind of stubborn pride among hardcore computer gamers in that they have the patience to install the patches, to investigate the bugs, to tweak the settings, etc.  Your average gamer will simply not give a toss, and while I do tip my hat to those who have braved the wilds of unpatched games, I think taking that for granted is hurting the PC-only titles out there.  Actually bothering to come up with something that’s as technically intact as possible (and I’m not talking bugs so much as make the freaking thing easy to patch and provide actual support) would, I think, go a long ways to helping with that.

And piracy.  You guys don’t even know how horrible piracy is to PC sales.  You can go “oh it’s a victimless crime” as much as you want, but when publishers look at sales as a way of giving business to developers (and even royalties), it is a huge problem.  If you Torrent a game, you may be saying “oh, I didn’t hurt anyone,” but the game industry isn’t like the movie industry, where everyone gets paid no matter what, and you have multiple investors.  Especially with smaller or self-published studios, there’s a lot more at stake.  Not to sound like your mom or anything, but it is a problem, and handwaving won’t fix it.  I don’t know precisely what will, but right now I’m erring on the side of speakin’ the truth from the developer’s perspective.  I know what it’s like to be poor – when I was a college kid I had to beg and borrow my games from friends – but please, don’t steal shit.  Shut down that Bittorrent link and give some poor dev that pizza money you’ve been saving.  It’s what helps them make more games you enjoy.

 
12. Consolization of PC games - dumbing down, appealing to the lowest common denominator or both? Feel free to argue that jumping on the console bandwagon doesn't affect games at all.

Honestly, I think there’s an erroneous expectation that putting a game on PC makes it “better” and on console makes it “worse.”  There’s a different crowd for each, but not as variant as I think some people believe.  There’s a very big difference between putting something on console and making a huge effort to make it “mainstream” – I think the latter does involve some dumbing-down.  There are different demands for each, and I think there’s a kind of elegance in some console development because hey – you only have so many buttons, and you only have so much memory, and you only have so much allowable time for loading.  I think, as I mentioned before, the hardcore PC gamer has volumes more patience than your hardcore console gamer, and while this is an admirable thing, it doesn’t have to be that way.  Elegance in design – menus, loading, controls, etc – shouldn’t be something that we expect solely from console titles, and we should expect more of games ported from one form to the other.

I play both console and PC titles, and while I think some genres just work far better on one than the other (will always prefer PC for FPSes, but consoles have some solid releases; RPGs have a wider representation on PC, but some notable successes on console; and I’ll rarely play a platformer on PC, and I’m hard-pressed to think of an adventure game I liked on console).  I don’t think it makes either one lesser, just different.  There seems to be a conception that console games are only done to make money, but all games (unless you’re talking about mod projects or freeware) are out there to make money, no matter the system.  I don’t think it’s impossible to make an intelligent, complex game for consoles – to me, the vector of control and construction will always be separate from what the developer intends the game to be.

* * *

Kids, let's thank Annie for her time and wish her luck in her endeavors.

« Last Edit: March 06, 2009, 10:28:11 pm by Vince » Logged
Oscar
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« Reply #1 on: March 06, 2009, 06:35:32 pm »

Nice interview. Thanks Annie Smile
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« Reply #2 on: March 06, 2009, 07:16:50 pm »

Nice interview, was a pleasure to read. Would have liked to know what you have been up to since leaving Obsidian.
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« Reply #3 on: March 06, 2009, 07:22:46 pm »

Awesome! Thanks to both Vince and Annie for this nice interview. And Annie, good luck with any future jobs.
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« Reply #4 on: March 06, 2009, 07:29:44 pm »

Nice interview, was a pleasure to read.

Yes, I really like the way she writes. Very pleasing to read.
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« Reply #5 on: March 06, 2009, 07:50:41 pm »

Great read, Annie, unique experience  Salute Thanks for the extensive interview, it answers a lot of questions I had in mind for a long time.
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« Reply #6 on: March 06, 2009, 08:40:41 pm »

I also thought it was a nice interview, and Annie's had some informative posts at the Codex lately as well. It was that kind of developer participation that originally brought me there in the first place, and I'm grateful a few are still willing to brave the waters (and/or come talk to you here, VD).
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« Reply #7 on: March 06, 2009, 10:09:53 pm »

Damn, those answers must've taken a while to write down. Nice read.  Salute
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« Reply #8 on: March 07, 2009, 01:39:50 am »

Great interview. It seems as if Obsidian was (is?) lacking slightly as far as organization and cohesion goes. I mean, I assumed most studios had separate teams for separate games, but from the interview it appears that everyone was constantly shuffled around and often had to design for multiple games at once.
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« Reply #9 on: March 07, 2009, 09:59:07 am »

Great interview.  Nice to know she's still around and kicking.   Salute

Quote from: Annie Carlson
I think it would a great deal of fun to make a game based on the old tabletop Paranoia license (YOU LOVE THE COMPUTER. THE COMPUTER IS YOUR FRIEND)
I think I love this woman.
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« Reply #10 on: March 07, 2009, 10:09:07 am »

Great interview. It seems as if Obsidian was (is?) lacking slightly as far as organization and cohesion goes. I mean, I assumed most studios had separate teams for separate games, but from the interview it appears that everyone was constantly shuffled around and often had to design for multiple games at once.
Working as a software engineer myself, I can say that it would be very rare for anyone to work solely on one project at a time, and even rarer for anyone whose job title has "01", "02", "junior", or some equivalent in it.  This is why functional management is en vogue now; it makes it easy to keep track of the people with a given skillbase, and assign them to projects as need be.
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« Reply #11 on: March 07, 2009, 12:54:36 pm »

Really interesting interview, thumbs up
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Hector
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« Reply #12 on: March 07, 2009, 01:20:10 pm »

Quote from: Annie Carlson
I think it would a great deal of fun to make a game based on the old tabletop Paranoia license (YOU LOVE THE COMPUTER. THE COMPUTER IS YOUR FRIEND)
I think I love this woman.

I'd buy it on release.
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For once we get a game with evil options that let you play malevolent character not just an obnoxious cunt. Happy times.

"Pardon me, good sir, might I take a moment to stab you in the lungs?"
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