Poll
Question: Which name do you prefer?
Pilgrims of the Void
Colony Ship - a Post-Earth role-playing game
Across the Void
No Home But the Stars
Born Beneath No Sun

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 6   Go Down
Print
Author Topic: New name, the second poll  (Read 10982 times)
Xaositect
Neophyte

Posts: 4


View Profile
« Reply #15 on: September 06, 2018, 09:20:27 pm »

Voted #1 but feel like #2 is pretty damn good also.


My only gripe is with the word "Earth". In my view, it's never exciting to relate to start travel, by mentioning Earth. I makes sense within context (aka - if you are familiar with the game or the book), but it is really confusing to the rest of us who do reside on Earth and do not regard our rather mundane lives as a wonderful journey across the stars.

I would replace "Post-Earth" with "Post-Human" or "Transhuman". It wouldn't be 100% accurate, but it would expand your marketing appeal into the transhumanist community (which might enjoy the game theme anyway).

Logged
Gareth
*
Posts: 3294


Indubitably


View Profile WWW
« Reply #16 on: September 07, 2018, 05:30:49 am »

"Colony Ship" just sounds very dry and utilitarian to me, dull.

Like sure, it tells you what the game is about. But the other names make me want to find out what the game is about. They intrigue me.

It's the difference between calling your game "No Man's Sky" or just "Spaceship Pilot".
Logged

“The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it.” - George Bernard Shaw

My blog
Ravn7
Neophyte

Posts: 12


RPGs since 1994


View Profile
« Reply #17 on: September 07, 2018, 06:12:13 am »

I have another idea.

Children of the Void

Fits the setting almost perfectly, in my opinion. But I would still use it as a subtitle. The main title should be something that says more about what to expect from the game.

I think Starfarer would be fine. But Generation Ship or Colony Ship wouldn't be bad, either. And Generation may be better than Colony Ship because the latter doesn't say anything about the time of travel* nor about what is going on with the people (they may be in hibernation).

Generation Ship: Children of the Void

____
*BTW, Alpha Centauri is way too close for any generation to pass during travel. Besides, all the planets there are most probably uninhabitable. Even Proxima Centauri, the best candidate in the system for having Earth-like planets, recently turned out to be deadly for any potential life due to its high flare activity.

I can't say for the others but for me realism is very important in making the world feel believable.
Logged

...flew into the dusk with its wings spread wide.
Vince
Developer

Posts: 8078



View Profile
« Reply #18 on: September 07, 2018, 08:21:10 am »

I have another idea.

Children of the Void
It's overused; 1,920,000 results on Google, Starcraft, Pathfinder, bands, tons of books.

Quote
*BTW, Alpha Centauri is way too close for any generation to pass during travel.
Google disagrees.

"The system might consist of the closest stars to our own sun, but it’s still pretty far away: 4.37 light years, or more than 25.6 trillion miles. We don’t really have the technology yet to send humans that far, either; on a conventional rocket, traveling at about 17,600 miles per hour, it would take about 165,000 years for humans reach Alpha Centauri (and then another 4.37 years for communications to travel back at the speed of light to let Earth know they’d arrived)."

"So … consider the two Voyagers – Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 – launched in 1977. Neither Voyagers is aimed toward Alpha Centauri, but if one of them were – assuming it maintained its current rate of speed – it would requires take tens of thousands of years to this next-nearest star. Eventually, the Voyagers will pass other stars. In about 40,000 years, Voyager 1 will drift within 1.6 light-years (9.3 trillion miles) of AC+79 3888, a star in the constellation of Camelopardalis. In some 296,000 years, Voyager 2 will pass 4.3 light-years from Sirius, the brightest star in the sky. Hmm, 4.3 light-years. That’s the distance between us and Alpha Centauri.

What about the New Horizons spacecraft, the first spacecraft ever to visit Pluto and its moons. NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft travels at 36,373 miles per hour (58,536 km/h). Launched from Earth in mid-January, 2006, it reached Pluto in mid-July, 2015 … nine-and-a-half years later. If New Horizons were aimed toward the Alpha Centauri system, which it isn’t, it would take this spacecraft about 78,000 years to get there. "

Our colony ship is from the future so it will cover the distance in only 400 years.

Quote
Besides, all the planets there are most probably uninhabitable. Even Proxima Centauri, the best candidate in the system for having Earth-like planets, recently turned out to be deadly for any potential life due to its high flare activity.

I can't say for the others but for me realism is very important in making the world feel believable.
http://www.ice.csic.es/personal/iribas/Proxima_b/

"A terrestrial exoplanet orbiting in the habitable zone of the nearest star Proxima Centauri has just been discovered. It has a mass about 30% larger than our planet and an orbital period (year) of 11.2 Earth days. Could it have an atmosphere? Could it have liquid water on its surface? How long is its day? What is its climate like today? Can we see it directly with a telescope now? And in the future? This website provides answers to these questions as a result of the studies that we have carried out and that have just been submitted for publication to the specialized Astronomy & Astrophysics journal.

Is Proxima Cen b habitable?

In two publications, a team of astronomers from Spain, Belgium, France, Germany, UK, and USA has studied the prospects for the recently discovered terrestrial planet Proxima b being a habitable world. Proxima b is a 1.3 Earth mass planet orbiting its star at about 1/20th of the Sun-Earth distance, which places it well within the so-called Habitable (Goldilocks) Zone. It receives an amount of energy from its central star that is about 2/3 of that received by the Earth from the Sun."

https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg23130884-100-proxima-b-closest-earth-like-planet-discovered-right-next-door/

"IT’S the planet we’ve all been waiting for. Earlier this month, rumours swirled that astronomers had discovered an Earth-like planet orbiting the closest star to our own, the aptly named Proxima Centauri. Well, the planet’s real, but don’t pack your interstellar bags yet, because this alien world is probably far from homely.

The planet – Proxima b – was discovered by astronomers who spent years looking for signs of the tiny gravitational tug exerted by a planet on its star, after spotting hints of such disruption in 2013. Proxima Centauri is 4.25 light years from Earth, making it slightly closer than the binary star system of Alpha Centauri, which the Proxima star is thought to loosely orbit.

“We’ve been excited for a long time,” says Guillem Anglada-Escudé of Queen Mary University of London, who led the discovery as part of a project called Pale Red Dot. “We’ve been hunting for this signal and confirmation of the planet for almost four years.”

The team says the planet is likely to be 30 per cent more massive than Earth, although it could be bigger than that. It orbits the star at a distance of 7.3 million kilometres – less than 5 per cent of the distance between Earth and the sun – making its year last just 11.2 Earth days.

You might think such a tight orbit would scorch the surface of the planet. But Proxima Centauri is a small, red dwarf star and shines much less fiercely than the sun. Standing on the surface of the planet, you’d see the star as a dull red orb, about three times as large as the sun appears from Earth. As a result, the planet sits in its star’s habitable zone, and its surface temperature may be right for it to host liquid water. "
Logged
Vince
Developer

Posts: 8078



View Profile
« Reply #19 on: September 07, 2018, 08:52:56 am »

"Colony Ship" just sounds very dry and utilitarian to me, dull.

Like sure, it tells you what the game is about. But the other names make me want to find out what the game is about. They intrigue me.

It's the difference between calling your game "No Man's Sky" or just "Spaceship Pilot".
It is dry and utilitarian, no arguing here, but so far it gets the strongest reaction. I really liked The New World despite the built-in problems and I liked the Pilgrims of Earth, which got a mixed reaction. All the artsy titles (suggested by others) are nice but they fall a bit off the mark. Across the Void is kinda generic and tells you nothing. No Home but the Stars is more suitable for a game like No Man's Sky. Born Beneath No Sun is kinda nice but it's not getting a lot of votes.
Logged
MidnightSun
Craftsman

Posts: 274



View Profile
« Reply #20 on: September 07, 2018, 09:43:56 am »

Is The New World really that bad at this point? I mean, what are we basing this on?

(I still like Generation of the Void)
Logged
Vince
Developer

Posts: 8078



View Profile
« Reply #21 on: September 07, 2018, 10:05:53 am »

Is The New World really that bad at this point? I mean, what are we basing this on?
https://www.pcgamer.com/hands-on-with-amazons-mmo-new-world-where-hundreds-of-players-war-over-a-supernatural-continent/

Amazon's inevitable marketing wave will kill all our attempts to generate awareness as most people would simply assume that The New World interview/preview/impressions/reviews are about Amazon's MMO. So if we keep the name we'll be relying on Steam exposure alone which will not be enough.
Logged
Ravn7
Neophyte

Posts: 12


RPGs since 1994


View Profile
« Reply #22 on: September 07, 2018, 10:32:30 am »

Vince,

1. Than maybe Starfarer: Orphans of the Void. There is a short story with that title but not combined with anything else. And people would search for Starfarer in the first place. Or Spacefarer. It's even less common.

2. You can't compare any current probes with an interstellar ship. It would use different power source and incomparable propulsion system. Most probably, a thermonuclear reactor and ways of gathering fuel during the travel.

And there is no point in sending a ship for a few hundred years long journey because the science moves forward and they would be outrun by other ships. So the idea itself doesn't make sense.

3. The article you posted is outdated. It doesn't include news about the discovery of the flares. 10 times hotter than our Sun's flares. Nothing could survive that.
« Last Edit: September 07, 2018, 12:32:09 pm by Ravn7 » Logged

...flew into the dusk with its wings spread wide.
hilf
Craftsman

Posts: 278



View Profile
« Reply #23 on: September 07, 2018, 10:47:23 am »

The World Anew.
Logged

I bought AoD on Thursday.
Vince
Developer

Posts: 8078



View Profile
« Reply #24 on: September 07, 2018, 12:57:52 pm »

1. Than maybe Starfarer: Orphans of the Void. There is a short story with that title but not combined with anything else. And people would search for Starfarer in the first place. Or Spacefarer. It's even less common.
No Orphans. That's like making a fantasy game with elves and orcs and calling it The Lord of the Amulets.

Quote
2. You can't compare any current probes with an interstellar ship. It would use different power source and incomparable propulsion system.
Of course. However, different and incomparable doesn't necessary mean light speed or close. Maybe in 500 years we'll be flying all over the galaxy and it would take a year to reach Proxima (the light speed). Maybe we'll only achieve 1% of light speed (100 years) or less, which is why we aren't talking about tens of thousands of years but about 400 years, which is a reasonable speed for an old cargo freighter.

At the moment:

"In 2018 though, a new NASA mission - Solar Probe Plus - will be launched. Designed to come as close as 8.5 solar radii to the Sun (that's about about 5.9 million kilometers or 3.7 million miles), it will hit orbital velocities as high as 200 kilometers a second (450,000 miles an hour).

To just put that incredible figure into perspective - going this fast would get you from the Earth to the Moon in about 1/2 an hour. It is also about 0.067% the speed of light."

Quote
And there is no point in sending a ship for a few hundred years long journey because the science moves forward and they would be outrun by other ships. So the itself doesn't make sense.
It doesn't always move fast, just look at the current tech. The airplane design didn't change in 60 years which is a long time considering where we were 60 years ago. Guns invented over 100 years ago are still as popular - M1911, which was designed in late 1890s. We still use internal combustion engines (designed in 1876) in our cars but we learned to make really cool interiors. We were dead certain in the 50s that we'll have flying cars in 2020 because that's like 70 years from 'now' and look at the cool things we're inventing every day! What really changed?

Quote
3. The article you posted is outdated. It doesn't include news about the discovery of the flares. 10 times hotter than our Sun's flares. Nothing could survive that.
Yes, I saw that, but in our universe them flares are manageable.
Logged
Table_Cloth
Neophyte

Posts: 1


View Profile
« Reply #25 on: September 07, 2018, 06:11:26 pm »

Pilgrims: Proxima Centauri
Sunless Exodus
Exodus of the Starfarer
Halfway to Canaan
The Starfarer's Pilgrims
Starfarer: A Generation Ship RPG
And a New Earth
400 Years in the Wilderness
Born Between Worlds
No Sun for Star Pilgrims

Logged
34s Cell
Artisan

Posts: 510



View Profile
« Reply #26 on: September 08, 2018, 01:02:23 am »

Prisoners of the Void

Something less evocative of space exploration and more claustrophobic.
Logged

"I'm an asshole"
Ga1us
Neophyte

Posts: 18


View Profile
« Reply #27 on: September 08, 2018, 03:00:30 am »

Across the colony ship with piligrims and no sun: a post-dungeon rats-esque role playing game
Logged
racshasa
Neophyte

Posts: 3



View Profile
« Reply #28 on: September 08, 2018, 05:26:07 am »

"born beneath no sun" is great
Logged
Ravn7
Neophyte

Posts: 12


RPGs since 1994


View Profile
« Reply #29 on: September 08, 2018, 07:35:08 am »

No Orphans. That's like making a fantasy game with elves and orcs and calling it The Lord of the Amulets.

I don't think Orphans of the Sky is so popular. I would consider a similar title a nod to hardcore sci-fi readers. And it's not a bad idea to choose a name that reminds of something. Something good, of course. But I see your point. What do you think about Warriors/Soldiers of the Void? Life on that ship may be a constant struggle and everyday fight. Or another idea: Bastards of the Void (although I'm not absolutely sure about how it sounds in English). Aforementioned Prisoners of the Void is fine, too.

Maybe in 500 years we'll be flying all over the galaxy and it would take a year to reach Proxima (the light speed). Maybe we'll only achieve 1% of light speed (100 years) or less, which is why we aren't talking about tens of thousands of years but about 400 years, which is a reasonable speed for an old cargo freighter.

Proxima Centauri is 4,2 ly. away. And we will achieve higher speeds. I'm sorry but it's obvious you haven't been reading anything about the science of space travel. A ship in space can use engines that generate low but constant thrust. Which provides it with a constant acceleration. Exactly like ion drives of modern probes. Thus, the longer it goes, the faster it goes. This way it can easily achieve extreme speeds, especially if it can gather fuel on the way. The biggest problem here is interstellar medium, aka space dust, and creating a proper shielding. But the science and technology for that will most certainly evolve. And you could just install more drives and power generators. Speed is not a problem. We could achieve 10% of the speed of light in the next century.

Especially some freighter which goes with 0,1% of light speed could be easily outrun by other ships.

In some ways current tech stays similar but mostly because no one cares to change it. Planes' engines actually made a great progress. Just not in the matter of speed but efficiency. Engine designers care most about operating costs because there is the greatest demand for it.

NASA could build much faster probes but they don't need to. On the other hand, designing a big interstellar ship would be a completely different thing. They would need tremendous resources which would allow them to make huge progress. It's like going to the Moon. It was a great undertaking for humanity. Without modern computers and almost no technology. But they did it.

It's just a matter of one simple thing. Motivation.

To illustrate that – this is an interesting part – after all these years we lost the ability to go to the Moon. Hell, NASA even lost the ability to go to space with shutting down of the Space Shuttle program. And why? Because they don't really need those things that much. No motivation.

Are you sure you want it to be a redesigned freighter? Then… it means they left Earth in such a hurry they had no time to build a proper colony ship. And there are no other colony ships because they would get there a few times faster and then they could be prepared to go back and get people from your freighter.

Anyway, at first I thought in your story there would be a colony ship that travels fast but to a distant star, much further than Proxima, with a stable planetary system and habitable planets. They are very scarce. On the Internet you can find lists of nearest G-type stars and pick something more suitable than some hellhole..

Yes, I saw that, but in our universe them flares are manageable.

Any planet in orbit around a red dwarf would have to huddle very close to its parent star to attain Earth-like surface temperatures; from 0.3 AU [note: 1 Astronomical Unit is a distance from the Sun to Earth] … to as little as 0.032 AU for a star like Proxima Centauri (such a world would have a year lasting just 6.3 days).

You can manage with flares when you are as far from the star as Earth. But no at 3% of that distance with ten times hotter flares.

Honestly, I think you should read more about interstellar travel and astronomy. Otherwise the setting will have huge holes that would be frustrating for anyone who is interested in the science part of sci-fi. Orphans of the Sky is an old story. They had no idea about so many things in the field of astronomy. They could see Mars only through telescopes. There was no probe in space. No photos of any planet. The book was more of a fantasy than sci-fi.

Personally, I expected more scientific accuracy from your game and I would be disappointed if I had buy it and then found out the setting doesn't really make sense in some important aspects.

For that reason I suggest reading something. These days even Wikipedia provides a good amount of information on astrophysics and space flight. This wouldn't be a bad place to start: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interstellar_travel. Then something about habitability of exoplanets: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planetary_habitability

Or the video I already recommended once: Interstellar Travel Challenges. There is also Spaceship Propulsion video and the Habitable Worlds series on the same channel by Isaac Arthur.

Also, you could hire a consultant. I know a physicist (his work included astrophysics) in Poland (lower salaries than in US) who likes video games. And scientific accuracy of movies, books and any other stories. I could always ask him if he would be interested. I guess he might if he has some free time. Actually, I can ask him now if he'd be interested in this game and talking on the forums.
Logged

...flew into the dusk with its wings spread wide.
Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 6   Go Up
Print
Jump to: