Iron Tower Studio ForumsRPGThe New WorldCSG update #27 - State of the Game (the first animations)
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Stellavore
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« Reply #45 on: June 18, 2018, 07:22:11 pm »

This thread is in very real danger of becoming a comedy thread.

My thoughts: The whole game environment is an abstraction, where an isometric view will inherently bring a level of isolation from pure immersion. As long as animations are distinguishable from one another, and offer some visual flair to add a bit of excitement, they are doing the job of entertaining us gamers, imo. Of course, I personally can appreciate differing levels of visual detail within a virtual environment abstraction, from nethack/doomrl, to fallout 1/2, and into more realistic abstraction vr-immersion like crysis and call of duty.

This leads me to another (unrelated) line of thought, which is sound design. This would be something that I would like to hear about from the developers. To me, good sound design has always pushed the immersion that little bit further; adding a bit of subtle illusion to the imagery, by helping to distinguish one pistol shot from another, a revolver reload from a magazine reload, a hit from a miss, or an armored hit from a fleshy hit. (My vision isn't that good, so sound design has always been huge for me.) Music is also a big, big part of the overall play experience, but I wasn't expecting to hear on that until much later in the dev cycle.

As always, thanks for the great work on this. And, if I should shut up, please have no hesitation in telling me so; I will not take offense.


By that same logic authors shouldnt bother researching the subjects they are writing about because the book is a non-immersive medium. Attention to detail is what makes a masterpiece.
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dogwaffler
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« Reply #46 on: June 19, 2018, 09:58:46 pm »

By that same logic authors shouldnt bother researching the subjects they are writing about because the book is a non-immersive medium. Attention to detail is what makes a masterpiece.

Agreed, but it's in practice prudent to not get too much caught up in minor details; especially given when there's so much work to do and such a limited worker base. This game company and the dev team do have a very real money and time budget to deal with, so sweating too many minor details can result in a rushed end phase or dead project altogether (not to mention burnt out artists or contributors).

Something like a wonky firearm actuation animation is really not worth spending too much time and attention on, for example. They're important, and a big part of immersion, but you don't want to run your artists into the ground on it when there is so, so much more work to be done. Of course it's a good idea to get the fundamentals of motion right early on, which is why projects like king kong 1933 are so lasting in scope.
« Last Edit: June 19, 2018, 11:56:43 pm by dogwaffler » Logged
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