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Author Topic: Malazan Empire books : Steven Erikson  (Read 13229 times)
dx__
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« Reply #30 on: December 16, 2009, 03:23:30 pm »

You shouldn't drop Martin if you're still reading the fourth book. Opinions on the quality of the three authors vary: some people hate Erikson and consider him to be a glorified Forgotten Realms novelist, others think Martin is the only competent author of the bunch etc. etc. I like them all for different reasons.

Malaz is very different in style to Bakker or Martin. It's like a high-level D&D campaign novel series, only with a good, extremely complex plotline and the most detailed and massive setting in epic fantasy. Erikson also has a vast imagination that is able to come up with very cool and creative concepts. Definitely give it a chance when you're done with ASoIaF.

Oh, and the first sequel to Prince of Nothing is out. It's called The Judging Eye. The overall reception has been rather lukewarm but I liked it very much. The plot doesn't make much progress but Bakker writes fascinating characters and developes his ideas further.

Well, I'll give the first three books a try, then. *cough* But... what's wrong with being a Forgotten Realms novelist?  Sad
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Tuomas
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« Reply #31 on: December 16, 2009, 03:32:32 pm »

Well, I'll give the first three books a try, then. *cough* But... what's wrong with being a Forgotten Realms novelist?  Sad

The first one isn't that great but books two and three are excellent. As for Forgotten Realms, there's nothing wrong with it in theory, but most of the stuff just is below mediocre quality.
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caster
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« Reply #32 on: December 17, 2009, 03:48:31 am »

Whatever!

I would trade all of that bullshit for this anyway, anytime:

"
Coltaine, his face gaunt and lined with exhaustion, strode down to where Duiker, Nether and Gesler waited near the awning. Behind the Fist came Bult, captains Lull and Sulmar, Corporal List and the warlocks Sormo and Nil.

/'Hood's breath!' Lull swung to Coltaine. 'Fist, we've got two of the Emperor's Old Guard here… as Coastal Marines.'
'It was a quiet posting, sir, until the uprising, anyway.'

Bult snorted. Captain Lull's scowl deepened. 'Where—oh, don't bother.' He addressed Gesler again. 'As for you and Stormy—'
'If you promote us, sir, I will punch you in what's left of your face.

And Stormy will likely kick you while you're down. Sir.' Gesler then smiled.
Bult pushed past Lull and stood face to face with the corporal, their noses almost touching. 'And, Corporal,' the commander hissed, 'would you punch me as well?'
Gesler's smile did not waver. 'Yes, sir. And Hood take me, I'll give the Fist's crack-thong a yank too, if you ask sweetly.'
There was a moment of dead silence.

"
 Smile

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« Reply #33 on: December 20, 2009, 09:20:02 pm »

Well, I'll give the first three books a try, then. *cough* But... what's wrong with being a Forgotten Realms novelist?  Sad

The first one isn't that great but books two and three are excellent. As for Forgotten Realms, there's nothing wrong with it in theory, but most of the stuff just is below mediocre quality.

Don't worry. I've heard my fair share of criticism for being an R.A. Salvatore fan. Yes, Drizzt is a Mary-Sue, but it's easy reading, and fun to read on a boring afternoon.
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caster
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« Reply #34 on: December 21, 2009, 12:51:38 pm »

There must be some other threads where you can talk about that, so please, kindly take it there.



Im close to finishing the sixth book "Bonehunters", following the Seven cities tale.
Things are getting satisfactorily complicated again, and the whole lore has a sensible progression in most cases. Im not finding all the strands difficult to folow at all, which was often mentioned in critiques i found of the books.

Sure its a little wider but not something hard in any way.
Out of a lot of things you could talk about in these books i find his handling of the undead theme really good.
Tlan Imass most of all, even though there are many other "undead" as such.

I cant recall any story where undead were given so much sense and reason, motivation to their "behavior" as in this case. He created something new out of the... very old, heh.
And he seems to be doing equally good job out of other older races too. Wonder what the Forkrul Assail will be like... Smile

Im not that much into whole Tiste thing though, Anomander Rake and his huge sword just create unwelcome images of Anime characters.

But on the other hand there are always Doggies.
>And even more Doggies who are even worse, naturally.
There was this beautiful scene of them hunting a Divers seven bodied demon... what a pleasure to read.

I found description of how those first Doggies actually adopted early tribes of humans and raised them really funny in the context of their whole story. And their shadows.  Evil


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I don't know, I don't care, and it doesn't make any difference! - Albert Einstein


The trouble ain't that there is too many fools, but that the lightning ain't distributed right.
Moose_and_Squirrel
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« Reply #35 on: February 07, 2010, 12:42:15 pm »

You shouldn't drop Martin if you're still reading the fourth book...Malaz is very different in style to Bakker or Martin. It's like a high-level D&D campaign novel series, only with a good, extremely complex plotline and the most detailed and massive setting in epic fantasy. Erikson also has a vast imagination that is able to come up with very cool and creative concepts.
I switched from Martin to Erikson, mostly because I got tired of waiting for Martin to write (He sure takes his time, doesn't he?).

I agree that his stories are like D&D campaigns.  He's admitted as much, hasn't he?  Erikson is a veteran P&P RPGer, and his books are based on those adventures.  And it shows.  For instance, "high-level" individuals ascend to god status.  Or they refuse to ascend and "retire" somewhere.  In one of his books, a god wanders into the wrong house and gets his ass kicked by the homeowner, an unheard of mortal.

I'm a big fan of Erikson's imagination and sense of humor.  His books work due to his fascination with fantasy-adventure role play.
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Max Roguespierre
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« Reply #36 on: September 29, 2018, 05:41:56 pm »

I recently decided to read Steven Erikson's Malazan Book of the Fallen series.

After wading into the first two hundred pages of Gardens of the Moon, for the time being I am shelving the series. (I may pick it up again at some future date but for now I am moving on to trying N.K. Jemisin's Broken Earth and Brandon Sanderson's Stormlight Archive series.)

As far as Gardens of the Moon, it's not a horrid or even an especially poor read, it just isn't compelling. As far as I could tell there is something of a story trying to get out of the writer's tortured prose. Unfortunately, Erikson provides little depth to his characters in the early chapters (presumably to preserve dramatic tension later in the story). This then makes it appear that the author is not quite equal to the task of world-building while also creating interesting characters in an engaging narrative.

Had I known that Gardens of the Moon is the first novel that Erikson has written, I might have persisted with it to the end because there are aspects of it that show promise. The world-building stands out with an intriguing, multi-dimensional, magic system that is really what kept me uncertain about putting the book down.

Oh well... the backlog of my reading list is still plenty long.   

 
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I know not what life is, nor death.
Year in year out-all but a dream.
Both Heaven and Hell are left behind;
I stand in the moonlit dawn,
Free from clouds of attachment.
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