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 1 
 on: Yesterday at 08:22:50 pm 
Started by Wrath of Dagon - Last post by Wrath of Dagon
None of that would've happened if it wasn't for WWI. WWII wouldn't have happened either. So we need to get to the bottom of who's responsible for that.

 2 
 on: Yesterday at 04:50:38 pm 
Started by Wrath of Dagon - Last post by Vince
Maybe it wasn't so simple too. From Lenin's letters, articles and speeches (especially when there was polemics about what to do next) it quite likely that they really took power when there was almost no one else to do this ...
Sounds like a justification to me. "We did it because really there was no one else, otherwise we'd never!"

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... and at least him was completely aware of how badly all that marxism stuff was suited to current situation in country.
Didn't stop him from issuing Marxist decrees right away to run the economy into the ground. Eventually, Lenin admitted his incompetence (not in so many words) and backpedaled to NEP, giving back many businesses to the original owners - yesterday's 'exploitators' of the proletariat became today's saviors, letting business-savvy people hire employees (up to 100), and renting out recently "liberated" farmlands.

Of course, Lenin wrote all kinds of proclamations (the one thing he was really good at), justifying it after the fact to avoid looking like a fool who doesn't know what he's doing, but it was clearly a significant step-back.

 3 
 on: Yesterday at 03:23:54 pm 
Started by Wrath of Dagon - Last post by menyalin
Lenin saw an opportunity and took it. Like any revolutionary, he cared more about seizing power and doing things his way (turned out his way sucked) than about the price because it's usually the other people who have to pay it.
Maybe it wasn't so simple too. From Lenin's letters, articles and speeches (especially when there was polemics about what to do next) it quite likely that they really took power when there was almost no one else to do this and at least him was completely aware of how badly all that marxism stuff was suited to current situation in country. Trotskiy was completely different story with his idea to burn Russia for starting true worldwide revolution and your description is much more.suitable to him.

 4 
 on: Yesterday at 01:58:06 pm 
Started by Max Roguespierre - Last post by Max Roguespierre
I have recently read Guy Gavriel Kay's Tigana. It has received extensive praise as a classic in the fantasy genre. While I am uncertain whether I would rate it among the very best works of fantasy, on the whole I found it to be an engaging read.

To start with Kay is a good writer. His prose is absorbing, expressive, and frequently exhibits a lyrical quality that is rare in the genre. There are flaws to be sure, both stylistic (run on sentences, excessive repetition, etc...) and plot related, nevertheless, it is a highly readable work and the good far outweighs the bad.

Kay creates a rich tapestry of a world inhabited by colorful and passionate characters. While the world is quite evocative the author is less interested in realism than in how the interplay of memory and interaction shape perception and identity.

My primary issue with Tigana is with the climax to the tale. It's almost as if Kay reached a point after over 500 pages where he decided it was time to wrap things up as expeditiously as possible. As such the immediate lead up to the climax, the climax itself, and its subsequent resolution feel hurried, haphazard, and improbable given all that has been previously written. Its not that the ending feels wrong or unearned, rather, to an extent, it feels rushed and forced.

As a footnote, Kay's use of magic is interesting and vivid on the micro level but comes across as vague and contrived on the macro level (deus ex machina).

 5 
 on: Yesterday at 12:01:01 pm 
Started by Vahha - Last post by menyalin
1) Quest_HD2_02.xml (UID 1855): "[ловкость] Бежать со всех ног. На секунду тебе кажется, что ты спас<ё/е>н</а>, но затем тебе между лопаток вонзается болт, опрокидывая тебя на землю. Ты пытаешься подняться, но потерял</а> уже столько крови, что силы уходят с каждым ударом сердца. Когда ты наконец собираешься с силами, другой болт попадает в цель, пришпилив тебя к земле и оборвав твою борьбу." - здесь должо быть [неудача], насколько я понял

2) Quest_HD2_05.xml - возможно, для боя на стороне ДД здесь не задана боевая награда. Не проходил этот момент, просто файлы просматриваю, так что сэйва нет.

Нужно почистить изображения, не смог загрузить скрин в полном размере.

 6 
 on: Yesterday at 11:08:55 am 
Started by Wrath of Dagon - Last post by Vince
Yes but that's not the point. Any war would have ended sooner and done less damage if one side had fewer or no allies.
Point is that Allies strengthened the losing side, prolonging the conflict deliberately. Their special services' activities, which, acting in the mainstream of the foreign policy of their governments aimed at dismembering and weakening Russia, were engaged not so much in gathering purely military information about the White Army as in studying the natural riches and material values of Russia. (by N.S.Kirmel)
I don't blame the Allies for looking after their own interests. I blame Lenin for starting the revolution that led to it. I've always felt that the Civil War was a horrible tragedy that split the country (father against son, brother against brother, not good Soviet people vs evil foreign invaders) and caused irreparable damage by killing or forcing out people who subscribed to different beliefs.

Look at it this way. Let's say the American socialists would reach a critical mass in 15-20 years and rise up against the government, aiming to abolish private property, profit, capitalism, etc (the slogans you see today). Naturally, the US government would ask its allies for help and they'd come because nobody wants to see this shit spreading. They'd have other reasons too, of course, but if they could end the revolt, they would, which would be good for the country. Of course, they could fail, in which case their intervention would prolong the conflict and cause more suffering, which doesn't mean that they shouldn't try. And if they fail, they'd try to weaken the new regime, which is understandable.

You're looking at it from the Soviet perspective, not from the perspective of the Russian Empire. As the winner the Soviets were right to view the intervention as a hostile action, but the Russia Empire had every right to ask for it and can't be blamed for not accepting the bolsheviks as the rightful rulers.

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The October Revolution wasn't the cause for all of this, but an evolution and continuation of the series of events that started long before it - the February Revolution of 1917, the Russian Revolution of 1905 - after which the civil war became imminent.
The October revolution was a power grab, plain and simple, not an evolution. Lenin saw an opportunity and took it. Like any revolutionary, he cared more about seizing power and doing things his way (turned out his way sucked) than about the price because it's usually the other people who have to pay it.

 7 
 on: Yesterday at 09:58:15 am 
Started by Vahha - Last post by Sunfire
Надо ведь и самому воспользоваться плодом своих трудов. Smile
Когда-нибудь воспользуюсь.

 8 
 on: Yesterday at 09:47:33 am 
Started by Wrath of Dagon - Last post by Sunfire
Yes but that's not the point. Any war would have ended sooner and done less damage if one side had fewer or no allies.
Point is that Allies strengthened the losing side, prolonging the conflict deliberately. Their special services' activities, which, acting in the mainstream of the foreign policy of their governments aimed at dismembering and weakening Russia, were engaged not so much in gathering purely military information about the White Army as in studying the natural riches and material values of Russia. (by N.S.Kirmel)

When you start a revolt, you can't or at least shouldn't complain that the other side keeps fighting you and brings in allies. Why? Because you are the one who started this shit in the first place. Would you deny that without the October Revolution, there'd be no intervention, no civil war, and no victims?
The October Revolution wasn't the cause for all of this, but an evolution and continuation of the series of events that started long before it - the February Revolution of 1917, the Russian Revolution of 1905 - after which the civil war became imminent.

Ironically, intervention actually could speed up the end of war: it was great incentive to unite against a common external enemy and very good basis for bolsheviks propaganda. Who knows how the history could turn out in another situation...
If that propaganda worked it had a steady basis upon it, not only the lie.

Yep, like on all the way of human history. And not without help from some of our fellow countrymen, unfortunately. And not to forget about Russian Empire's obligations in WW1 too.
Exactly.

 9 
 on: Yesterday at 08:49:52 am 
Started by Vahha - Last post by menyalin
Я целиком давно не проходил - не с чем сравнивать будет, да и времени на это нет Sad
Надо ведь и самому воспользоваться плодом своих трудов. Smile

 10 
 on: Yesterday at 07:50:05 am 
Started by Wrath of Dagon - Last post by menyalin
Will you deny that without this intervention Russian Civil War would have ended much earlier and with much less victims (on both sides)?
Ironically, intervention actually could speed up the end of war: it was great incentive to unite against a common external enemy and very good basis for bolsheviks propaganda. Who knows how the history could turn out in another situation...

Those countries wished to snatch a cut/part of falling empire and weaken (Soviet) Russia - and they succeed in that goal - despite the ongoing/subsequent humanitarian disaster and economical collapse. So aiding the White Army and opposing 'the communist plague' looks merely like an excuses. They just took advantage of the situation and 'saved' the neighborhood goods from neighborhood burning house, so that the neighbor f@cked up rebuilding it again.
Yep, like on all the way of human history. And not without help from some of our fellow countrymen, unfortunately. And not to forget about Russian Empire's obligations in WW1 too.

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